Salt dough ammonites

Following on from our trip, we were very interested in ammonites and we decided to create some of our own using salt dough.

As a team we followed a set of instructions to make the dough.

To make the salt dough we used flour, salt and water. We mixed them altogether in a large bowl and gradually added water to the mixture until it was the right consistency. It got really tricky to mix once the water was added so Miss Collins and Miss Nevin had to get their hands in it!

Once the dough was ready we each were given an amount to roll into a cylinder ready to create our ammonite shape. After that, we then had to create fossil markings on the dough. This process was a challenge because you had to make sure the markings were deep enough in the dough without breaking through the bottom of the fossil.

Finally, the ammonites were placed in the oven to bake on a low heat.

They turned out great! What did you think of them when we brought them home?

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Our Trip to Great North Museum

As part of our Land of the Dinosaurs topic Key Stage One and the ARC took a trip to the Great North Museum. When we were there we took a fossil workshop and explored the dinosaur discovery bags which were great fun!

We found out all about ammonites and some of us even took park in the role play of how ammonite fossils were discovered. They were very wriggly fossils! We even looked at T-Rex fossil poop!

After the workshop and discovery bags we went on a tour around the museum.

The trip made us all very enthusiastic about our learning and we couldn’t wait to get on with our topic learning back at school.

Thank you once again to our parent helpers who accompanied us on the trip too, we hope you had a great day too.

Magnificent Maths!

In Maths, we have been learning all about ESTIMATING.

Did you know estimating means a sensible guess.

We found out that when you estimate it is always best to estimate a number that can be found in the ten times table. For example saying there are about 20 beads in the jar is a better close estimate than saying an exact number such as 23.

After practising with a partnerĀ getting a close estimate a few times we then went on to accurately count.

Accurately means bang on! We even have an action for this. Ask a Year 2 if you see them around school or at home.

Sometimes it can be a real challenge to accurately count a large number of objects. As a class, we worked together and came up with a clever method to help us make sure we were counting accurately when working with a lot of items. It is much easier when you put the objects into groups of 10. Then you can count in tens and add whatever is left over.

We accepted the challenge and solved a problem! What great perseverance we have shown!